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Life in Community

Every moment of life is an opportunity to learn. Antioch College stakes its existence on that ideal philosophical ground. It turns that ideal into reality through three evolving, tightly intertwined strategies for learning, (1) study, (2) work, and (3) community living.

Community living is more than a collection of individuals who inhabit a common space. The Antioch community has been loaded with purpose since its founding in 1852. All who study and work for the College – students, faculty, administrators and staff – are carefully chosen to achieve two transformations.

First, make the world better.

Antiochians feel marked by founding President Horace Mann's plea to the 1859 graduates:

I beseech you to treasure up in your hearts these my parting words: Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity.

An editor of College publications captured the impact of Mann's final plea: "Our students have the audacity to believe that they can make a difference in the world, and they usually do."

Second, live by the Honor Code, the comprehensive baseline of our individual and communal choices. The Honor Code folds Mann's social motto, "win some victory for humanity," into a broader community context as "the pursuit of social justice."

Antioch College is a community dedicated to the search for truth, the development of individual potential, and the pursuit of social justice. In order to fulfill our objectives, freedom must be matched by responsibility. As a member of the Antioch College community, I affirm that I will be honest and respectful in all my relationships, and I will advance these standards of behavior in others.

Whatever our roles, we make choices that affect ourselves and others. The Honor Code advances a voluntary moral sensitivity as the baseline of our individual and communal choices. Other, more directive norms for behavior, such as the Sexual Offense Prevention Policy, are available when explicit guidance is needed.

Since the 1920s, the Antioch College community has developed shared governance processes and structures in quest of transformative ideals. Since the 1930s, we have lived as "a laboratory for democracy."